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One common procedure many people undergo at the dentist is dental crowns installation. After all, it’s a treatment option with a wide application of uses. Dental crowns are often recommended for patients who need extra fillings on certain teeth. This can occur when a patient undergoes a root canal or needs a large filling that exceeds the natural tooth structure. Other than being a curative treatment, crowns are also recommended for cosmetic purposes.

If your dentist has recommended that you get crowns installed on a few teeth, here are the basics of the placement, preparation, and installation processes:

Placing a Temporary Crown

Before installing the permanent crown, the dentist will have to place a temporary crown. The purpose of the temporary crown is to keep the prepared tooth from moving as well as to keep it from contamination before the tooth is filled. No movement must occur in the prepared tooth as it can cause problems in the fitting of the permanent crown.

Those having permanent crowns installed should note that the procedure can cause their teeth to become extremely hypersensitive to temperature and pressure. If you experience sensitivity and discomfort, let your dentist know as they may have to redo the process of making a final impression and fabricating a permanent crown.

Preparing the Tooth’s Crown

In preparing the crown of the tooth before it is filled, the dentist will first take a small impression of the affected tooth. The purpose of the impression is to ensure the size of the tooth that needs to be filled. The dentist will then fill the impression tray with an acrylic resin material. After one to two minutes, the material will have set and the impression can be removed from your mouth.

At this point, the temporary crown can now be shaped according to the size of the area that needs to be filled. To secure the temporary crown onto the tooth, the dentist will place a temporary cement over the tooth. The dentist will make sure that there are no rough or sharp edges surrounding the crown and that there are no hindrances to biting using the upper and lower teeth.

Installing the Permanent Crown

A permanent crown typically takes around seven to ten business days to be completed. Once it’s ready, the dentist can cement it to your teeth and make it permanent. The first part of the procedure is the injection of a local anesthetic to numb the affected tooth and its surrounding tissues. The dentist can thereafter remove the temporary crown from the tooth. Then, the dentist will clean the tooth and any surrounding teeth thoroughly.

When the tooth is completely dry, the dentist can start putting on the permanent crown onto the tooth while checking for possible contact between the teeth. The dentist will use dental floss to make sure that the crown will fit properly. Once the crown is secured, the dentist can start the cementation process. The dentist will first clean and dry the tooth by isolating it from saliva and applying a desensitizing agent to secure the permanent crown as well as possible.

Conclusion

When you visit your dentist, it’s essential to understand the reason behind every procedure. If you have other queries regarding your permanent crown treatment, don’t hesitate to bring them up with your dentist.

Seeking a cosmetic dental procedure? If you’re looking for highly skilled dentists in Ann Arbor and Waterford, MI, we’re the ones for you. Schedule an appointment with us today!

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Ann Arbor Dentist Office
Hours : Mon to Fri 9am - 6pm, Sat 9am - 3pm
Address : 4860 Washtenaw Ave D, Ann Arbor, MI 48108
Waterford Dentist Office
Hours : Mon to Fri 9am - 6pm, Sat 9am - 3pm
Address : 5979 Highland Rd, Waterford Twp, MI 48327
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