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Having smooth and shiny teeth is a good indication that you’re practicing good dental hygiene techniques. Running your tongue along the surface of your teeth is a good enough test to see how smooth the surface of your teeth is.

However, what does it mean if you have rough and grainy teeth? Most of the time, it could be just tartar buildup. But in some cases, rough teeth could mean there’s an issue with the enamel in your teeth. Here’s what the experts in Dental House MI have to say about the topic.

What is Tooth Enamel?

The roughness you feel when you run your tongue over your teeth is probably enamel, which is the thin outer layer of your teeth. Enamel is a tough shell and is considered the hardest tissue in the human body. It covers the crown of your teeth that’s visible outside the gums.

Enamel helps protect your teeth from the daily stresses of chewing, grinding, and biting in your mouth. Despite its rocklike hardness, it can still be chipped or cracked. However, enamel is nowhere near like a broken bone that can mend over time. Once your tooth is chipped or it breaks, the damage is permanent. Your body cannot repair it because it lacks living cells.

Enamel Erosion

Aside from the risk of cracking, enamel is also vulnerable to erosion caused by too much acid in your mouth. That acid will continue to erode your teeth leading to that rough surface that you feel with your tongue. Many factors could contribute to enamel erosion. Some of the most likely causes are:

Citric Acid

Acid-rich food like lemons, limes, oranges, and grapefruits can contribute to enamel erosion. Consuming too much fruit with citric acid can be bad for your teeth.

Carbonated Drinks

Your favorite soda or carbonated drinks are basically a combination of acid and sugar. If you drink a lot of soda, it can also make your teeth feel rougher than usual.

Acid Reflux

People who suffer from acid reflux tend to regurgitate acidic compounds that could also affect their teeth. As much as possible, avoid food and drinks that could trigger your acid reflux.

Chlorine

If you like to swim a lot in a chlorinated pool with the water occasionally coming into contact with teeth, enamel erosion is likely to happen.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy is also linked to an influx of acid in the body, leading to erosion. Brushing and rinsing your teeth regularly can help dispel some of the acidity in your teeth.

Looking at all those factors, they all gave one common denominator—acid. Too much acid in your mouth will lead to enamel erosion. By limiting your consumption of acidic food and drink, you can protect your teeth from erosion.

Preventing Enamel Erosion

According to the Dental House MI experts, the best and simplest way to strengthen your teeth’ enamel is by following good oral hygiene practices. Brushing regularly with enamel-strengthening toothpaste helps a lot. You can also supplement this by drinking fluoridated water, which remains in your saliva for your teeth to absorb. Lastly, chewing sugarless gum stimulates saliva production, which can cleanse your enamel and remineralize your teeth.

Conclusion

By making good choices in oral hygiene and an acidless diet, you can prevent enamel erosion. In time, you’ll notice the roughness of your teeth going away and become smoother. Just continue doing your part in strengthening your enamel for more smooth sailing oral health.

If you’re looking for affordable dental services, turn to Dental House MI. We provide preventive, restorative, and cosmetic dentistry services at our Ann Arbor and Waterford locations. Experience spa-inspired comforts while you wait for your turn in the dentist’s chair. Our local dentist in Ann Arbor and Waterford will welcome you on your next visit. Book your appointment today!

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Need help? We're available at
Ann Arbor Dentist Office
Hours : Mon & Wed 9am - 7pm, Tues & Thur & Fri 9am - 6pm, Sat 9am - 3pm
Address : 4860 Washtenaw Ave D, Ann Arbor, MI 48108
Waterford Dentist Office
Hours : Mon to Fri 9am - 6pm, Sat 9am - 3pm
Address : 5979 Highland Rd, Waterford Twp, MI 48327
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